This blog provides a commentary on landslide events occurring worldwide, including the landslides themselves, latest research, and conferences and meetings. The blog is written on a personal basis by Dave Petley, who is the Wilson Professor of Hazard and Risk in the Department of Geography at Durham University in the United Kingdom.

This blog is a personal project that does not seek to represent Durham University.

Monday, 16 August 2010

Where on Google Earth 211 (updated with result)

There is a long running competition in the Geoblogosphere called "Where on Google Earth" (WOGE), which essentially challenges readers to identify locations pictured on Google Earth imagery.   The last was WOGE (number 210), hosted by Meta-Geologist; I was the lucky winner.  The winner gains the right to choose and host the next one, so here it is:


The rules of Where on Google Earth are that to win you must post in a comment the location of the image (lat, long), together with a brief description of the reason for its geological interest. The prize is the right to produce and host the next one.  You will be unsurprised to hear that the site in question contains a landslide - in this case very a large one.

RESULT: Both Christoph and Jorge were correct in the location.  There is indeed an ancient, cubic kilometre scale rock avalancke deposit in the valley, and upstream there are extensive lake deposits.  On the basis of this, I declare Jorge the winner, who now gets the right to set the next one.

Dave

9 comments:

Dave S. said...

I initially thought this was the Hunza River Valley in Pakistan, but upon closer inspection, it doesn't look like it! Time to dig a little further...

Christoph said...

It's in the Himalaya, close to Annapurna: 28°41'29.46"N 83°37'42.70"E. In 2002, a landslide destroyed the village of Khobang almost entirely. The area is subject to landslides frequently, which are not only a natural desaster, but can also have positive effects for humans (compare this project of Heidelberg University: http://archiv.ub.uni-heidelberg.de/savifadok/volltexte/2006/17/).

José Díaz said...

I was going the same way as Dave S...

Jorge said...

Indeed it's in Nepal and shows the deepest valley on earth (around 2500 m between two peaks of more that 8000 m. In pre-historic times there was a giant rockslide near the bent of the Kali Gandaki valley which blocked the valley by a 600 m high dam. The lake silted up totally; remnants of the dam of the lacustrine sediments are still there. See Hanisch 1996 and Fort 2003.

Ripendra Awal said...

The approximate location of landslide dam in the image is located at 28o38’44.81” latitude and 83o35’44.51” longitude. The geographic Position of this area is Kali Gandhaki Valley, Mustang, Nepal. The main geological interest in this image is a giant rockslide that covers an area of about 10km2. The rockslide formed a barrier that dammed the Kali Gandhaki River near Kalopani village. From Kalopani towards the north the Kali Gandhaki valley widens as far as the village of Kagbeni to a more than 30 km long former dammed reservoir of the river. The reservoir was filled with alluvions, mass wasting and lake sediments.

Christoph said...

@Jorge: I think you got the details right and you should maybe post the next one, if that's okay with Dave. Cheers,

Christoph

Anonymous said...

There is no location of the image (lat, long) in Mr. Jorge's comment.

Anonymous said...

There is no location of the image (lat, long) in Mr. Jorge's comment.

Ron Schott said...

WoGE #212 is posted.